Beyond the speaking venue – 3 ways to get talked about (F!RST framework, part 5)

How can you spread your message beyond the audience you’re speaking to?

Well, in the F!RST framework’s overview (which suggests 5 ways to be a top presenter), I wrote:

By getting talked about through social media and other channels, you can reach far more people who can champion your message.

In effect, that lets you “breathe new life” into your talk. So it’s fitting that getting talked about uses the acronym “CPR”…

In this post, then, you’ll find techniques you can use on social media and elsewhere to get your message talked about.

As you’ll see in a few moments, the techniques are arranged into these 3 pillars:

  • CConversation – Speak conversationally, so people get used to engaging with and responding to your message, which makes them more likely to share it.
  • PPromotion – Market your talk (before, after, and even during your event) to tempt people to post about it.
  • RRecording – Publish video highlights of your talk, which gives people something else concrete to share.

You can click any of those links to jump to the details below. Or, just keep reading

 

Pillar 1: ConversationScroll to Contents ↑

Get people used to engaging with your content – they’re more likely to share

This pillar’s based on the following premise: If you get people used to engaging with and responding to your content (by making your talk conversational), they’re more likely to share it.

In fact, you can get all my tips for conversational speaking in a recent post I wrote. So for full details, please click that link.

 

Pillar 2: PromotionScroll to Contents ↑

To tempt people to post about your talk, you can promote it at these times:

 

Before your event

Before your speaking event, you can increase engagement by posting about it on social media (and on your blog or website if you have one). That has 3 benefits:

  • More people will hear about your event.
  • It’s easy for people to repost your messages to their followers.
  • If there’s an event organiser, they’ll love you for promoting the event!

Post on several days, and at various times of day, to increase your reach. For tips on what content to put in your posts, see the sections below:

Add generic and specific hashtagsScroll to Contents ↑

Include an obvious, generic hashtag about your topic

To make your posts visible to as many people as you can, include an obvious, generic hashtag about your topic. For instance, if you’ll be presenting about public speaking, you’d likely use:

#PublicSpeaking

Also add a specific hashtag about your core message

To intrigue people about your content, it’s helpful to also add a specific hashtag about your core message. For example, if I was going to present about the subject of this blog post, I’d tend to use a pair of hashtags like these:

#PublicSpeaking #GetTalkedAbout

If you’ll be speaking at a conference or other multi-speaker event, also find out what the event’s hashtag is, and include that in your posts too.

Mention specific peopleScroll to Contents ↑

Mention other speakers…

To further increase the reach of your posts, @-mention one or more relevant people as well. For instance, you could mention other speakers who’ll appear at the same event, or an industry expert who you quote on one of your slides.

Raise attendees’ issues

Especially when you’ll present your talk online, you’ll likely have a Web-based system where people can sign up. One benefit of those systems is you can often use them to ask attendees a few questions about their interest in your topic, to better focus your talk. Then, you can use their responses (without people’s names) in your pre-event promotion.

For instance, you might post messages on Twitter and Facebook like this:

Want tips for your #PublicSpeaking? 92% of registrants for my workshop at #SpeakerFest18 want to use social media to increase their reach and #GetTalkedAbout. Join me & @JohnSmith to learn how http://bit.ly/2OA4Emp

 

During your eventScroll to Contents ↑

To promote your talk while you’re speaking, my key suggestion is:

Make it easy for
people to look good
to their followers.

If you do that, they’re far more likely to share your content during your talk. That’s just one reason I recommend you make your talk’s content:

  • Easy to share
  • Compelling
  • Professional-looking

More specifically, try these tips, which I’ve grouped into those same 3 categories:

After your eventScroll to Contents ↑

After you finish speaking, there are still ways you can promote your message to get more mileage from it:

 

Pillar 3: RecordingScroll to Contents ↑

Give people some-thing extremely concrete to share

By publishing video highlights of your talk, you give people something extremely concrete to share. That’s one of the best ways to get more speaking gigs, because prospective organisers can be far more confident about what you’ll deliver on the day.

For detailed tips, see my post on making videos of your presentations. In particular, the section about keeping your video short is relevant here. That’s because people are much less patient when they watch a talk on video compared with watching the same talk in person.

So, you’ll get the best response if you make each video just a couple of minutes long.

 

Over to youScroll to Contents ↑

As a reminder, here are the 3 pillars I recommend you use for getting your presentation talked about, letting you “breathe new life into it” through “CPR”:

  • CConversation – Speak conversationally, so people get used to engaging with and responding to your message, which makes them more likely to share it.
  • PPromotion – Market your talk (before, after, and even during your event) to tempt people to post about it.
  • RRecording – Publish video highlights of your talk, which gives people something else concrete to share.

What’s your feeling about those? Are there techniques I’ve left out? Let me know your thoughts in the comments.

 

Also check outScroll to Contents ↑

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